The most important piece of information that you will need when comparing retail electricity providers is the electricity supply rate that you are currently paying. With all of the information, numbers, and extra details on your utility bill, finding your supply rate can sometimes be perplexing. To eliminate this confusion, we’ve provided you with a few samples of bills from major utilities in deregulated areas across the nation.

The supply rate is always expressed in cents. The rate is multiplied by your electric usage, which is expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh), to determine your total charge for electric supply. You’ll see that the supply rate is different from the delivery rate charges on your bill. Unlike supply, you cannot shop around for your delivery – which will always be carried out by your default utility.

 

Connecticut Light & Power (CL&P) – Connecticut

The supply charge for CL&P is found on the first page of the bill, just above the payment stub. You’ll see your actual usage as measured by your more recent meter reading, expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh). Your usage is then multiplied by the rate, circled below, to determine your total supply costs. Here, the supply rate is 11.793 cents/kWh.

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 Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) – Illinois

The supply charge for ComEd is found on the first page of the bill, just below your meter information. You’ll see your actual usage as measured by your more recent meter reading, expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh). For ComEd, your total supply rate is the sum of the supply charge and the transmission service charge, circled below: 6.177 cents + 0.0816 cents = 6.993 cents. Your usage is then multiplied by the supply rate of 6.993 cents to determine your total supply costs.

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 Baltimore Gas & Electric (BGE) – Maryland

The supply charge for BGE is found on the second page of the bill under Electric Details at the top left. You’ll see your actual usage as measured by your more recent meter reading, expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh). Your usage is then multiplied by the rate, circled below, to determine your total supply costs. Here, the supply rate is 9.037 cents/kWh.

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Consumers Energy – Michigan

The supply charge for Consumers Energy is found on the first page of the bill, just below the payment stub. You’ll see your actual usage as measured by your more recent meter reading, expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh). For Consumers Energy, your total supply rate is the sum of the supply charges and cost recovery charges, circled below. In this example, the customer exceeded a normal usage of 600 kWh, so a higher rate was charged for the extra usage. Generally, however, most customers don’t go over this usage. Therefore, the ‘normal’ rate you are charged is the rate at 600 kWh or below plus the cost recovery charge: 7.0923 cents + 0.052 cents = 7.1443 cents/kWh. 

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PSE&G – New Jersey

The supply charge for PSE&G is found on the third page of the bill, below delivery charges. You’ll see your actual usage as measured by your most recent meter reading, expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh). Your usage is then multiplied by the rate, circled below, to determine your total supply costs. In this example, the customer exceeded a normal usage of 600 kWh, so a higher rate was charged for the extra usage. Generally, however, most customers don’t go over this usage. Therefore, the ‘normal’ rate you are charged is the rate at 600 kWh or below: 12.2369 cents/kWh. 

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Consolidated Edison (Con Ed) – New York

The supply charge for Con Ed is found on the second page of the bill, under Your Electricity Charges. You’ll see your actual usage as measured by your more recent meter reading, expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh). Your usage is then multiplied by the rate, circled below, to determine your total supply costs. Here, the supply rate is 7.4862 cents/kWh.

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National Grid (Niagra Mohawk) – New York

The supply charge for National Grid is found on the second or third page page of the bill under “Supply Services”. Your electric usage is measured by your most recent meter reading, expressed in cents per kilowatt hours (kWh). Your usage is then multiplied by the rate, circled below, to determine your total supply costs. Here, the supply rate is 6.284 cents/kWh.

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Duke Energy – Ohio

The supply charge for Duke is found on the second page of the bill, below gas charges (if applicable). You’ll see your actual usage as measured by your more recent meter reading, expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh). Your usage is then multiplied by the rate, circled below, to determine your total supply costs. Here, the supply rate is 4.418 cents/kWh.

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PECO – Pennsylvania

The supply charge for PECO is found on the second page of the bill in the Electric Residential Service section. You’ll see your actual usage as measured by your more recent meter reading, expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh). Your usage is then multiplied by the rate, circled below, to determine your total supply costs. Here, the supply rate is 7.66 cents/kWh.

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